Why do people usually not seek treatment for depression?

They think they should be able to handle it. Despite progress in recent years to highlight the importance of mental health care, many people fear being stigmatized if they admit that they need help.

Why do people usually not seek treatment for depression?

They think they should be able to handle it. Despite progress in recent years to highlight the importance of mental health care, many people fear being stigmatized if they admit that they need help. It's fantastic that Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, for example, talked about his struggle with depression, so that people would know that it could happen to anyone and that depression isn't a sign of weakness, but that he didn't have to risk much to do it. He's a rich movie star who can dump a garbage truck.

Most people struggling with mental illness are in a less secure position. Unsure of themselves and their position in life, it's difficult to risk valuable social and professional capital to seek help. Admitting your problem to your doctor, your spouse, or even to yourself can be difficult. One of the most common reasons for not seeking help is fear and shame.

People recognize the negative stigma and discrimination associated with having a mental illness and don't want to be labeled as “mentally ill” or “crazy.” They may also be concerned about how that label could negatively affect their career, education, or other life goals. The second way that people may not know that they need help is simply not knowing that what they are experiencing is a recognized mental health problem that can be treated effectively. Even if someone is interested in receiving mental health treatment, they may not know how to find the right professional care. In some underserved areas, there may be few or no mental health professionals, especially those who provide treatment for more complex problems.

Another common obstacle to mental health care is the inability to pay for treatment due to financial difficulties or lack of health insurance. These areas are often medically neglected, and the situation of mental health care and addiction treatment is even worse. A study by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that between 30 and 80 percent of people with mental health problems do not seek treatment. They show that, in most cases, most people who have real mental health problems never get the proper care they need.

It's probably not much of a surprise that many people with mental health problems don't easily seek treatment for their problems. Some people have been demoralized by their mental health problems and believe that “nothing will help me” or “I will never get better”. This may be due to cultural and language barriers that may prevent access to mental health treatment. Despite the increase in national spending on mental health services over the past decade and the specific increase in available services, a large proportion of people with anxiety and depression still do not receive the help and treatment they need.

The idea of telling a stranger about your private feelings can be overwhelming, as it is for most people, but it's important to know that mental health professionals are there to help you and not to judge you. The recent expansion of mental health insurance benefits in the U.S. The U.S. has opened up new care options for many people who were previously uninsured and couldn't afford treatment out of pocket.

Many people believe that they are inadequate or a failure if they have to admit that something is “wrong” with their mental health.